State and explain aristotle s theory virtue ethics

Particular justice is the correct distribution of just deserts to others. Some people, despite intending to do the right thing, cannot act according to their own choice. By contrast, pleasure, like seeing and many other activities, is not something that comes into existence through a developmental process.

Whether one needs other concepts and, if so, how many, is still a matter of debate among virtue ethicists, as is the question of whether virtue ethics even ought to be offering an account of right action.

He explained that it was necessary not to aim at too much accuracy at the starting point of any discussion to do with controversial matters such as those concerning what is just or what is beautiful. Having philosophy as one's ultimate aim does not put an end to the need for developing and exercising practical wisdom and the ethical virtues.

Adults, on the other hand, are culpable if they mess things up by being thoughtless, insensitive, reckless, impulsive, shortsighted, and by assuming that what suits them will suit everyone instead of taking a more objective viewpoint.

In raising this question—what is the good. Aristotle's methodology in ethics therefore pays more attention than does Plato's to the connections that normally obtain between virtue and other goods. Aristotle does not deny that when we take pleasure in an activity we get better at it, but when he says that pleasure completes an activity by supervening on it, like the bloom that accompanies those who have achieved the highest point of physical beauty, his point is that the activity complemented by pleasure is already perfect, and the pleasure that accompanies it is a bonus that serves no further purpose.

However, even though the systematising of moral thought can travel a long way from our starting point, according to the exemplarist it never reaches a stage where reference to exemplars is replaced by the recognition of something more fundamental. Even if one lived in a city populated entirely by perfectly virtuous citizens, the number with whom one could carry on a friendship of the perfect type would be at most a handful.

As we observe the people around us, we find ourselves wanting to be like some of them in at least some respects and not wanting to be like others. One must make a selection among pleasures by determining which are better.

If one lived in a community filled with good people, and cooperated on an occasional basis with each of them, in a spirit of good will and admiration, would that not provide sufficient scope for virtuous activity and a well-lived life.

So far from offering a decision procedure, Aristotle insists that this is something that no ethical theory can do. Here we have no difficulty in recognizing that I might think I was healthy, either physically or psychologically, or think that I was flourishing but be wrong. Virtues come into the account as one of the ways in which some things namely, persons could resemble God.

Initially, the objection was based on a misunderstanding. So there is a link between eudaimonia and what confers virtue status on a character trait. Theoria is not the process of learning that leads to understanding; that process is not a candidate for our ultimate end, because it is undertaken for the sake of a further goal.

If what we know about virtue is only what is said in Books II through V, then our grasp of our ultimate end is radically incomplete, because we still have not studied the intellectual virtue that enables us to reason well in any given situation.

Virtue Ethics

If it is the circumstances in which the agent acts—say that she is very poor when she sees someone drop a full purse or that she is in deep grief when someone visits seeking help—then indeed it is particularly admirable of her to restore the purse or give the help when it is hard for her to do so.

Since activities differ with respect to goodness and badness, some being worth choosing, others worth avoiding, and others neither, the same is true of pleasures as well. All free males are born with the potential to become ethically virtuous and practically wise, but to achieve these goals they must go through two stages: Possessing a virtue is a matter of degree.

Aristotle's Ethics

Just as property is ill cared for when it is owned by all, and just as a child would be poorly nurtured were he to receive no special parental care—points Aristotle makes in Politics II. For without friends no one would choose to live, though he had all other goods. These are precisely the questions that were asked in antiquity by the Stoics, and they came to the conclusion that such common emotions as anger and fear are always inappropriate.

According to this view, it is inconsistent to claim for example servility as a female virtue, while at the same time not proposing it as a male one. He is not making the tautological claim that wrongful sexual activity is wrong, but the more specific and contentious point that marriages ought to be governed by a rule of strict fidelity.

So, although Aristotle holds that ethics cannot be reduced to a system of rules, however complex, he insists that some rules are inviolable.

But love for my family might make a different use of my time and attention. The standard we should use in making comparisons between rival options is virtuous activity, because that has been shown to be identical to happiness.

Virtue Ethics

Snow, Nancy,Virtue as Social Intelligence: That suggests that at least those virtue ethicists who take their inspiration from Aristotle should have resources to offer for the development of virtue politics. The life of pleasure is construed in Book I as a life devoted to physical pleasure, and is quickly dismissed because of its vulgarity.

These qualities are discussed in IV. By contrast, in Book VII Aristotle strongly implies that the pleasure of contemplation is the good, because in one way or another all living beings aim at this sort of pleasure. The Human Good and the Function Argument The principal idea with which Aristotle begins is that there are differences of opinion about what is best for human beings, and that to profit from ethical inquiry we must resolve this disagreement.

There is no universal rule, for example, about how much food an athlete should eat, and it would be absurd to infer from the fact that 10 lbs. When feeling conflicts with reason, what occurs is better described as a fight between feeling-allied-with-limited-reasoning and full-fledged reason.

One of these is epistemologywhere a distinctive virtue epistemology has been developed by Linda Zagzebski and others. Possible conflicts between the remaining virtues can then be managed if they are tied together in some way as part of a unified whole Russell Having read Book VI and completed our study of what these two forms of wisdom are, how are we better able to succeed in finding the mean in particular situations?.

Mar 31,  · Virtue Ethics and the view that ethics should be wholly concerned with a person’s attributes based on the holistic theory of Aristotle and his Golden Mean, is a newly accepted theory, which looks at a person’s virtues and not their actions.

Aristotle's perspective on ethics was based on the virtue of being human; in other words, virtue ethics. There are two important distinctions between Aristotle's approach to ethics and the other. Jul 18,  · Virtue ethics is currently one of three major approaches in normative ethics.

It may, initially, be identified as the one that emphasizes the virtues, or moral character, in contrast to the approach that emphasizes duties or rules (deontology) or that emphasizes the consequences of actions (consequentialism).

In fact, virtue ethics takes its inspiration from Aristotle's approach to ethics—in particular, sharing his emphasis on character excellence, and ethical psychology.

Aristotelian ethics

Some philosophers, in particular Bernard Williams, regard Aristotle's ethics as superior to the Utilitarian and Kantian traditions, which have come to be the dominant approaches. ARISTOTLE’S ETHICAL THEORY VIRTUE ETHICS DR.

DAVE YOUNT, MESA COMMUNITY COLLEGE I. ARISTOTLE ( – BCE) This feature helps explain why the mean is Golden: It is rare to be able to hit the mean in every action, Not every action or emotion has a mean.

d. What is virtue then?

Aristotle's Ethics

Virtue is a state of deliberate moral purpose. Like much of the Western tradition, virtue theory seems to have originated in ancient Greek philosophy.

Virtue ethics began with Socrates, and was subsequently developed further by Plato, Aristotle, and the douglasishere.com ethics refers to a collection of normative ethical philosophies that place an emphasis on being rather than doing.

Another way to say this is that in virtue ethics, morality.

Virtue ethics State and explain aristotle s theory virtue ethics
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Virtue Ethics (Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy)